1.  
RB  NYG
Rush Att
283
Rush Yds
1377
Rush TD
12
Rush Avg
4.9
Rec
81
Rec Yds
677
Rec TD
4
Rec Avg
8.4
While the debate still rages over whether it's ever worth taking a running back with a top-5 draft pick in the modern NFL, Barkley could hardly have done more to make the case for his position. The second overall pick in 2018 became just the third rookie to eclipse 2,000 scrimmage yards (joining Eric Dickerson and Edgerrin James) while breaking Reggie Bush's rookie record for catches by a running back. In fact, Barkley's 91 catches tied Odell Beckham Jr.'s franchise record by a rookie, to say nothing of all the other Giants records he set. His unreal blend of power, elusiveness and wheels (at 21.91 mph Barkley recorded the third-fastest speed of any 2018 rushing TD) makes him the top big-play threat in the league. His seven runs of 40-plus yards were the most since Adrian Peterson had eight in 2012, and Barkley and Randy Moss are the only players in NFL history to score five TDs of 50-plus yards in their debut campaigns. Barkley could see more stacked fronts this season with the team's quarterback play potentially hitting rock bottom (he faced eight-man fronts on just 23 percent of his carries last season), but an improved offensive line will help mitigate the impact, and the Giants still have a decent receiving corps even without Beckham. The bottom line is simple: in terms of his production floor and ceiling, Barkley can't be touched.
2.  
RB  NO
Rush Att
213
Rush Yds
1000
Rush TD
11
Rush Avg
4.7
Rec
77
Rec Yds
711
Rec TD
3
Rec Avg
9.2
As great as Kamara has been through his first two NFL seasons, it's possible he's only scratching the surface of his potential. His carries jumped by more than 60 percent last year without taking anything away from his role in the passing game, resulting in 18 total TDs. The Saints weren't afraid to use him in short-yardage situations (his 16 carries inside the 5 tied for fifth in the league) and the decision to let Mark Ingram walk this offseason and replace him with Latavius Murray suggests Kamara's role on the ground could expand further in 2019. The extra volume did result in lower efficiency, but the third-year back possesses top-shelf elusiveness and speed in the open field, and he consistently runs with toughness. Drew Brees' knack for finding Kamara in space doesn't hurt, either. Some time soon, New Orleans might have to reckon with a decline from its legendary QB, but Kamara will help cushion that blow when it eventually falls. If he joins the 300-touch club, he could take a run at 2,000 scrimmage yards.
3.  
Rush Att
211
Rush Yds
978
Rush TD
8
Rush Avg
4.6
Rec
87
Rec Yds
711
Rec TD
3
Rec Avg
8.2
When a coach or GM makes a preseason promise to get a specific player more touches, it's often forgotten by about Week 3 as the reasons the player wasn't more involved to begin with become apparent. That wasn't the case with McCaffrey in 2018. Coach Ron Rivera anointed him his bell cow in training camp, and the second-year back thrived with the increased workload, playing 16 games for the second consecutive season while seeing his YPC jump by more than a full yard and his touches increase by 65.5 percent. CMac showed no fear as a runner, attacking holes rather than dancing around (his efficiency rating, which measures how much east-west running a player does for each north-south yard gained, was fifth among qualified RBs) and his elusiveness and speed allowed him to chew up real estate. He fell just short of 2,000 scrimmage yards despite playing behind an offensive line that lost both its starting tackles to injuries in August. The bad news for McCaffrey is that Rivera now says he gave him too many snaps and plans to scale back a bit this season. If he keeps producing when he gets the ball, though, it will be tough to take him off the field when it matters most.
4.  
WR  HOU
Rec
107
Rec Yds
1488
Rec TD
10
Rec Avg
13.9
Rush Att
2
Rush Yds
11
Rush TD
0
Rush Avg
5.5
Hopkins might not be the biggest or fastest receiver in the league, but he's one of the best. Coming off a volume-driven 2017, Hopkins took his efficiency to new heights last year with 194 more yards on 11 fewer targets. The result was a career high 9.6 YPT, good for sixth among the league's 28 100-target wideouts. At 6-1, 212, and with average speed (he ran a 4.57 at the combine but a 4.46 at his Pro Day), Hopkins excels with precise route running, unmatched body control, situational awareness and the best hands in the game (he caught 115 passes with only two drops last year). Hopkins can make the big play (four catches of 40-plus yards, T-11th), but his bread and butter is the intermediate route (23 catches of 20-plus, 4th, and with an average target depth of 11.5 yards, 7th). He also sees plenty of work in the red zone - his 25 targets inside the 20 ranked fourth, his 15 inside the 10 first, and his nine inside the five also first, i.e., his second straight season with double-digit TDs was no fluke. Hopkins returns as the team's unquestioned No. 1 receiver, with a quality quarterback in Deshaun Watson and perfect complementary targets in Will Fuller (to stretch the field) and Keke Coutee (to man the slot). Neither is a threat to Hopkins' overall volume or dominant red-zone role. Hopkins suffered a sprained AC joint in his shoulder during a playoff loss to the Colts, and while he seems to have made a full recovery during the offseason, an ankle injury sent him to the PUP list for the start of training camp.
5.  
Rec
109
Rec Yds
1445
Rec TD
9
Rec Avg
13.3
Rush Att
3
Rush Yds
21
Rush TD
0
Rush Avg
7.0
The age-old fantasy question for wide receivers is whether you'd rather have the only game in town that attracts most of the defense's attention, or someone with a quality complement who cuts into his workload but also pulls away defenders. With Antonio Brown gone, Smith-Schuster's 2019 will provide a case study, as he is now the unquestioned No. 1 for Ben Roethlisberger and the Steelers. Smith-Schuster has been a star since entering the league in 2017, with a whopping 11.6 YPT on 79 looks as a rookie and a 166-111-1,426-7 line as a sophomore last year. While he couldn't match his 2017 efficiency, he finished with a respectable 8.6 YPT, almost a full yard better than Brown's. At 6-1, 215, Smith-Schuster is built like Hines Ward - far more stout than the quicker, thinner Brown. And while, like Brown, Smith-Schuster showed pedestrian speed at the combine - 4.54 40 - he's made big plays throughout his young career with 11 catches of 40-plus yards on 245 targets. The Steelers signed Donte Moncrief this offseason, and second-year man James Washington should have an increased role, but it's unlikely the two will replace Brown's 168 overall targets or his 24 looks in the red zone. Yes, defenses will key on Smith-Schuster as the team's top weapon in the passing game, but volume is almost always king, and we can probably view last year's 166 targets (4th) as his healthy floor.
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